Introducing Handground
Precision Coffee Grinder

As I mentioned last week in what I hope will be the final “re-launch” of this blog, one of the cool coffee things to happen during my absence was the arrival of my Handground Precision Coffee Grinder. This much-anticipated manual coffee grinder is the end result of a long development process involving coffee professionals and enthusiasts from all corners of the globe (read their full story here), and it is becoming my go-to grinder for rather unexpected reasons.

First things first… If you haven’t heard about Handground yet, here are the basic points:

• Ceramic burrs
• Side-mounted handle
• Full range of grind size with easy adjustment
• Large 100g capacity
• Tight burr tolerance for more consistent grind
• Elegant finish and iconic shape

I’m a big fan of the large capacity and 40mm burrs. In the past, I had traveled with a smaller grinder and it did ok for the occasional Aeropress, but this can handle enough for a full pot of coffee in our Bonavita. And I haven’t tried this yet, but traveling with the Handground could mean better coffee while still using a hotel coffee pot. (Need to carry filters, though, as most hospitality coffee is now filter-packed.)

Like any other hand coffee grinder, portability and travel are potential highlights for most users, and Handground has excellent features to make travel brewing more minimalist than ever. Hash marks on the side can be used for measuring coffee in place of a scale, with each mark representing around 10g on average. The included recipe magnet gives common weights for popular brew methods, showing how many hash marks get you in the ballpark. It might not be geeky enough for some, but it’s as I like to say, close enough for jazz.

The recipe guide is arranged in a circle, with the inner track representing grind size, from 1 to 8 with additional steps in-between for a full 15 settings. Cute icons highlight six of the most common brew methods, from espresso to french press, and right out of the box I’ve found their suggestions to be solid.

The best part about the adjustment ring is the ability to adjust without taking the grinder apart. My previous hand grinder required me to turn a small knob hidden on the bottom end of the burrs, and there was no indication of where I was in the range so it was nearly impossible to dial in. Handground solves that problem perfectly.

Now, one of their biggest claims is more consistent particle size. They even have testing data posted on their website, and the graphs show a pretty strong peak, with most of the coffee falling within a narrow range. I’d say that’s really good for a hand grinder, though my initial impression was skeptical when I saw the few large particles among the rest. It’s not really fair to compare with my primary grinder, of course, since it’s a commercial machine with legendary consistency, and the proof is in the pour.

While the larger particles are easy to spot, the fines are less fine than that of my big grinder, so a large 50-60g Chemex doesn’t get clogged so easily. The results are good, though I’m still learning to adjust, since I am more likely to under extract than to watch the timer continue to climb while coffee struggles to escape the bottom of the cone.

My only point of contention is the difficulty of grinding, which is the same as I’ve experienced with any other manual grinder. Sometimes you’re going to hit a bean that is harder, or at a certain angle in the burrs perhaps, and it’s just going to require more oomph to get through it. This requires holding the grinder still with your other hand, and in this case the grinder is so large that keeping it steady has proven more difficult than I anticipated. The rubber gripper on the bottom doesn’t really help on my butcher block coffee bar, so grinding is a bit of a workout.

But, this is one of the reasons I enjoy it, and one of the reasons it is becoming my everyday grinder.

Grinding by hand requires focus and patience. Trying to grind too quickly, or doing so without paying attention, makes it more of a struggle in the end. So for me, grinding my morning coffee has become a moment of mindfulness, something we desperately need in a world of distractions.

So despite the occasional challenge, I recommend the Handground Precision Coffee Grinder for anyone who wants more focus and mindful practice in their daily coffee routine. I have challenged myself to use it exclusively for all pour-overs at home this year. I’ll share more experience later, including a look at the cleaning process, which is supposed to be quite simple.

Readers: do you use a hand grinder? If so, is it only for travel, or do you also use it at home?

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